How to Make the Most of a Long Weekend

2-13 Insta

Who doesn’t love a long weekend? It gives you a whole extra day to get things done, plus you get a break from work. Memorial Day is first and foremost a holiday to honor the fallen servicemen and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. Make sure to take time on Monday to honor them and all that they have done.

We encourage you to really make the most of this long weekend and spend some time on all of the things you need to do to get ready for the 3-Day. Turn this three-day weekend into a “3-Day Weekend!” Tackle your tasks one by one for your most productive weekend yet this year!

Friday: Educate

There is so much to learn about the 3-Day, the difference Susan G. Komen is making in the fight against breast cancer, and how you can prepare your mind and body for your 60-mile journey! After a long week, take some time to relax and read up on Friday night. Then you’ll be able to approach the rest of the weekend with a well-rested body and a mind full of all kinds of new information.

1-18 Insta

Saturday: Train and Teambuild

Saturday means it’s time to get busy! Schedule a training walk or other work out with your friends and teammates first thing in the morning. That will get you moving and grooving through your long weekend right off the bat! Then, use the afternoon to work on fundraising and teambuilding. We have some fun ideas for ways to take both your fundraising and teambuilding outside to really make the most of the weekend weather (hopefully filled with sunshine!).

Sunday: Get to Know Your Coaches

We love our coaches! From the amazing women who have been with us for years, to our new coaches in Seattle, Philadelphia and New England, they are here to be your biggest help on your 3-Day journey. If you haven’t already connected with them on social media, Sunday is the perfect day to do so!

IMG_2078.1

Did you know they all have their own Facebook pages? You can check them out here:

These pages are a super easy way to contact your coaches, find out about local training walks and events and learn more about registration discounts and rewards. Plus, it will show them some love to have you follow them as part of the 3-Day family.

Monday: Relax and Reward

You made it to Monday, and you don’t even have to work! Congrats! That means it’s time to kick those 60-mile feet back and give yourself a rest. Prepare for the week ahead, acknowledge all that you have done over the weekend, and don’t forget to honor any servicemen and women in your life. Tuesday will be a new day, and you’re going to be prepared to take it by storm!

What are your plans for the long weekend? Tell us in the comments!

 430x287

 

 

 

 

 

 

For tips about healthy living, click here for advice and support to keep you on track for the 3-Day and beyond. Thanks to the support of Amgen and in partnership with American Bone Health, the Healthy Living series was designed to prepare your mind, body and bones for the 3-Day.

Music Monday: Top 3-Day Training Songs

3-11 Post.jpg

Happy Monday!

While we know Monday isn’t everyone’s favorite day of the week, that doesn’t mean you can’t spread smiles and 3-Day fun throughout the day. The quickest way to do that is with some fun music!

So, if you need a little extra motivation today, we have just the playlist for you! It’s compiled from songs 3-Dayers have submitted on social media, put all in one place for your listening pleasure.

 

Let our playlist fuel your next training walk, kick off your next team meeting, or give you a mid-afternoon pick-me-up at the office!

If you want to create your own Monday playlist, you can draw more inspiration from these other blog posts:

And be sure to share more of your favorite songs below in the comments! We want to know what gets you out and stepping

 

For tips about healthy living, click here for advice and support to keep you on track for the 3-Day and beyond. Thanks to the support of Amgen and in partnership with American Bone Health, the Healthy Living series was designed to prepare your mind, body and bones for the 3-Day.

430x287-2

 

Healthy Living: Preparing Your Mind, Body and Bones for the 3-Day

Thanks to the support of Amgen and working in partnership with American Bone Health we are excited to provide you with a special series of emails, blogs and additional resources that will help prepare you for this life-changing event, as well as year-round health.

Why calcium is important and how you can incorporate it into your diet

Special Guest Contributor: Shirin Hooshmand PhD, RD

Whenever I speak with people about bone health, they always have the most questions about calcium.

Calcium is one of the most important and plentiful minerals in the body. When calcium combines with phosphate, it becomes the material that makes the bones and teeth strong. We also need calcium for transmitting nerve impulses, contracting muscles and clotting blood.

The body regulates the calcium that is circulating in the blood and tissues. Calcium is absorbed in the intestines and either reclaimed or excreted by the kidneys. If the blood level of calcium falls, glands in the body signal the bones to release calcium into the blood. Over time, if that calcium isn’t replenished, bone loss could occur. That is why it is important to get enough calcium, preferably through food.

Vitamin D and calcium work together. When calcium works its way through the stomach and into the intestines, vitamin D helps with absorption of calcium into the blood stream. Without sufficient vitamin D, you will absorb less calcium from your diet.

Children need the most calcium while their bones are growing. For women, after peak bone mass is obtained, the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for calcium goes down and then goes up again around the age of menopause, when women start to lose bone mass because of declines in estrogen levels. As we age, calcium metabolism is harder to maintain and the RDA stays the same.

Life stage group Calcium
RDA
Calcium rich servings Vitamin D RDA
9–18 years old 1,300 4 600
19–50 years old 1,000 3 600
MEN: 51–70 years old 1,000 3 600
WOMEN: 51–70 years old 1,200 4 600
71+ years old 1,200 4 800

Sometimes it’s easier to think about calcium in terms of servings of food. Getting calcium from food is the best option since your body is better able to put it to use. The best sources of dietary calcium are foods that have 200 or more milligrams per serving. This includes dairy or calcium-fortified foods such as milk, cheese, fortified juices and cereals, and you will see on the labels that they contain anywhere from 200 to 400 milligrams per serving. Fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds have smaller amounts of calcium, and the calcium in fruits and vegetables attaches to fiber and passes through the body.

Try to find three or four sources of high amounts of calcium that work for you each day. You can also think about how to have one source of a high amount of calcium at every meal.

HIGH CALCIUM FOODS (contain 200+ mg) MODERATE CALCIUM FOODS (contain 50-200 mg) LOW CALCIUM FOODS (contain <50 mg)
Dairy Foods Almonds Nuts and seeds
Sardines Beans Broccoli
Fortified cereals Canned salmon Cabbage
Fortified soy milk Green vegetables Fruits
Fortified tofu Breads

What if I’m lactose intolerant?

People who are lactose intolerant are at risk of not getting enough calcium. There is no cure for lactose intolerance, but here are some things you can do to reduce symptoms.

Try to reduce the amount of lactose per serving rather than avoiding it. Some studies show people with lactose intolerance can eat at least 12 grams of lactose (equivalent to 1 cup of milk) with minor or no symptoms. When lactose is taken with other foods, some people can tolerate up to 18 grams.

Shop for lactose-free milk. Milk that has been treated with lactase is widely available and often well tolerated by people with lactose intolerance.

Think about hard cheeses. Hard cheeses, such as most cheddars, Parmigiano-Reggiano and Romano, do not have lactose since their lactose is changed into lactic acid as the cheese ages.

Try soy-based beverages that are fortified with calcium. Soy-based beverages are the only plant-based option listed on MyPlate. Other plant- and nut-based beverages, such as rice and almond beverages, may not have the same nutritional value as soy. It’s important to read food labels carefully.

Most importantly, try to get a balanced diet with 5 servings of fruits and vegetables a day. With a balanced diet, you are sure to get all of the additional vitamins and minerals you need for strong bones.

About Dr. Hooshmand

Shirin Hooshmand, PhD, RD, is a member of the American Bone Health Medical and Scientific Advisory Board. Dr. Hooshmand is Associate Professor of Nutrition at the School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences at San Diego State University. She received her PhD at Florida State University working in the area of nutrition, bone, and cartilage. Her current research interests include bone and calcium metabolism, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, and functional foods. She has published 45 original articles in peer reviewed journals and presented more than 90 abstracts in national and international symposiums.