Sidewalks to Science: Getting to Know Dr. Paula D. Bos, Ph.D. at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine

With lab colleagues at VCU

Dedicating her life to finding a cure for breast cancer, Dr. Paula D. Bos is driven to help Komen meet our Bold Goal of reducing the current number of breast cancer deaths in the U.S. by 50% by 2026. As an Assistant Professor of Pathology, she and members of her lab are dedicated to developing new treatment options for breast cancer patients with metastatic brain tumors.

In this month’s Sidewalks to Science blog, we will get to know Dr. Bos a little better.

When I’m not in the lab I…

  • Enjoy the outdoors with my daughter and husband.
  • Love reading and baking with my daughter.
  • Am an enthusiastic follower of my daughter’s soccer team. As a native Argentinian, I am very passionate about soccer.

Family Picture at the beach

 What I do…targeting immune cells to treat brain metastases.

Although metastatic breast cancer has spread to another part of the body, it’s still considered and treated as breast cancer. Breast cancer that has spread to the brain is treated with breast cancer drugs, rather than treatments for a cancer that began in the brain. However, treatments that work for the primary breast tumor are often ineffective at treating the metastatic brain tumor. Current treatment strategies for brain metastasis, which include surgery and radiation, only offer some improvements for most patients. Therefore, I want to improve the options available to breast cancer patients that have developed brain metastases.

I am investigating how a type of immune cell called a regulatory T (Treg) cell helps breast cancer cells that have spread to the brain grow and survive. Tregs can be found in primary and metastatic breast tumors and correlate with poor patient prognosis. A normal function for Tregs is controlling immune responses, and researchers have shown these cells have the ability to suppress the immune system response against cancer. With my Komen funding, I’m studying how Treg cells support brain metastases. I’m trying to develop a treatment strategy to disrupt the support of breast cancer cells that have metastasized to the brain that could be used in patients.

Breast cancer…touches the lives of so many.

My aunt is a 12-year breast cancer survivor, and other types of cancers have taken dear family members and friends.

Working with patients…motivates my research strategy.

Through my research, I have met and come to admire an incredible group of advocates. Their strength and tireless efforts to bring awareness and increase funding for breast cancer research are a constant incentive to intensify our research efforts.

Dr. Paula Bos

People with breast cancer should…participate in clinical trials!

With new technologies available, science is progressing at a fast pace. We have seen major improvements in the treatment of cancer, especially with the immune system checkpoint blocking antibodies. Breast cancer has yet seen the benefit seen by other cancers, but several approaches are at the clinical trial stage.

Komen is…about patient advocacy!

I have always been motivated to do research to answer pressing clinical needs, but since I started working with patient advocates a few years ago, I now have a better understanding of where the priorities are. Involving advocates allows us to know we are on the right track to discover something of value to the patient community.

“Research is a challenging, expensive, and time-consuming activity. Knowing that patient advocates agree with the goals of our research is reassuring that we are on the right track to discover something of value.”

You can support Dr. Bos and her research by donating directly to her grant here.

If you or a loved one needs information or resources about clinical trials, call our Clinical Trial Information Helpline at 1-877 GO KOMEN (1-877- 465- 6636) or email clinicaltrialinfo@komen.org.

The helpline offers breast cancer clinical trial education and support, such as:

  • Knowing when to consider a trial
  • How to find a trial
  • How to decide which trial is best
  • What to expect during a trial
  • Information about clinical trial resources

Sidewalks to Science: Getting to know Dr. Carmen Bergom, M.D., Ph.D. at Medical College of Wisconsin

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Dedicating her life to finding a cure for breast cancer, Dr. Carmen Bergom is driven to help Komen meet our Bold Goal of reducing the current number of breast cancer deaths by 50% by 2026. As a radiation oncology physician, she works closely with patients and patient advocates that inspire her to improve breast cancer outcomes through research and clinical care.

In this month’s Sidewalks to Science blog, we will get to know Dr. Bergom a little better.

When I’m not in the lab I…

  • Love to spend time with my husband and three wonderful daughters, ages 5 to 13
  • Enjoy spending time on the lake with my family
  • Love to ski

Bergom Komen Event 2

What I do… study the tumor cell microenvironment to potentially enhance treatment options

My team studies the environment around the breast cancer tumor cell that influences growth, spread and treatment response. Better understanding these environmental factors could lead to improved targeted treatment options for patients.

Breast cancer is… personal to me, my friends and family

I have a family history of the disease and have witnessed too many loved ones be directly impacted by breast cancer. These experiences led me to become a radiation oncology physician scientist, specifically treating breast cancer patients as well as leading a breast cancer research lab.

Bergom Lab 4

Working with patients… has helped shape my current research program

In my interactions with patients, I would see people who had the same stage, tumor markers and other predictive features, and then have vastly different outcomes from treatments. That’s what made me focus my work on recognizing these non-tumor differentiators, and this research that could lead to more personalized and effective treatments.

People with breast cancer should… ask for help when they need it

Friends, family, support groups and organizations like Komen are always there to help breast cancer patients in need. Using resources to assist with cancer-related challenges may reduce stress and anxiety in some patients, helping to ease an already challenging time.

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Komen is… helping the community

I have a special affinity for organizations like Komen that battle breast cancer on all fronts — advocacy, research, and community — all improving patient outcomes. In addition to participating in the Race for the Cure and local Affiliate fundraisers, I have also had the privilege of giving laboratory tours to patient advocates, helping them see our research at work.

“Like everyone touched by breast cancer, I believe improved outcomes for breast cancer patients cannot be achieved soon enough!”