Let’s Get Personal: Create Your Own 3-Day Fundraising Page URL

Today we welcome Paula, the Susan G. Komen Seattle 3-Day Participant Coach, who will be sharing details about one of her favorite fundraising tools!

“Help! My donor couldn’t find my web page to make a donation!” As a Susan G. Komen 3-Day® coach, I frequently encounter this crisis in calls and emails from frantic participants, and I take the opportunity to don my “hero” cape and share one of the best Komen 3-Day tips out there – the Personal Page URL! This handy, personalized web link is easy to create, and will make donating to you a one-click piece of cake for your 3-Day® donors!

A URL (which stand for Uniform Resource Locator, in case you were curious) is the “address” or location of a specific web page. When you type the address of a web page into your browser (usually starting with www), you are typing a URL. That’s as technical as I will get.

Every registered 3-Day participant has a personal donation page on the 3-Day website, and every personal page has its very own URL. When you get started, your page’s URL is a messy jumble of letters and characters that no one would remember. Mine looks like this: http://www.the3day.org/site/TR?px=1228513&fr_id=1935&pg=personal. Not very user friendly, is it?

If you send your emails directly from your 3-Day Participant Center, they will automatically include your page URL at the bottom of the email, but if you send paper letters, or send emails from your personal email address, or talk to your donors face-to-face, it’s useful to have a personal page URL that is easy to remember.

So what’s a determined fundraiser to do? This is where the 3-Day Personal Page URL comes in. You can create a “pretty” URL for yourself, then share it with your donors who can then reach your page with just one click. And don’t we all want to make donating as easy as possible? I know I do!

Creating your very own 3-Day Personal Page URL is easy. Here is what you need to do:

  1. Log into your 3-Day Participant Center. Find the Participant Center Home menu on the right side of your landing page, click “Edit Personal Page.”susan g. komen 3-day breast cancer walk blog fundraising tools personal page URL web address
  2. On the next page you will see a light pink shaded box just under the page header. Click the URL Settings link on the right. (The screenshot below shows my Personal Page URL. Yours will appear once you create it in the next step).susan g. komen 3-day breast cancer walk blog fundraising tools personal page URL web address
  3. Type your name in the text box as you want it to appear in your new URL. The URL will always start with The3Day.org/goto/ but the ending is all yours to personalize. You could use your first and last name (PaulaHultman), your name and the year (Paula2015 or PaulaHultman2015), your name and the city you’re walking in (SanDiego_Paula) or anything else that is relatively short, easy to spell and easy to remember (Paula.Loves.Pink). You won’t be able to use spaces, but letters and numbers are fine, as are dots, dashes and underscores. IMPORTANT: If the personal URL you’re trying is already being used by another 3-Day participant, you will get a message that the URL is already taken. In these cases, you can try adding your middle initial, or a nickname to differentiate your URL, or try something completely different.susan g. komen 3-day breast cancer walk blog fundraising tools personal page URL web address
  1. Click Save and your Personal Page URL will be ready to share. Click the link yourself to see how easy it will be for donors to reach your page and make their donation.

It’s that easy! Now all you have to do is share your pretty new URL with your donors. As I mentioned earlier, when you send out emails directly from your Participant Center, a link to your donation page is automatically included, so including your new Personal Page URL here is optional. It’s also automatically included if you post on Facebook using the official 3-Day Facebook app. However, if you are sending emails from your personal email account, sending out an old fashioned fundraising letter, or posting your own messages on social media, always include your Personal Page URL so donors can easily find you. If your email provider allows you to create a signature that will automatically be added to your outgoing email, be sure to add your URL there as well.

There you have it, my favorite fundraising tip! If you need help with your Personal Page URL, your 3-Day coaches are just a call or email away (800-996-3DAY, or The3Day.org/Contact). We are always happy to assist you!

Three Reasons Why You Should Always Ask for a Specific Donation Amount

Quick poll: while fundraising for the Susan G. Komen 3-Day®, who among you has written a fundraising letter or email, posted a Facebook ask, or made an in-person request and used some version of the following statement: “Please donate whatever amount you’re comfortable with.”

It’s true that every donation made to the Komen 3-Day—no matter the amount—is important and will make an impact in the fight against breast cancer. But experience has shown us that asking your donors to give a specific amount is a more successful fundraising tactic than the “whatever you’re comfortable with” route. Here’s why:

An Unmistakable Call to Action – People like to be given directions. When you ask for 3-Day® donations in a specific amount, you give your donors a clear instruction to act on, which will make them more likely to donate right away. Putting a deadline on your request is another great way to motivate your donors to give without delay.susan g. komen 3-Day breast cancer walk blog fundraising donations

Aim High, Land High – For the past several years, I’ve straight-up asked my donors for $100 donations in my initial fundraising emails. I make no apologies for it, and I remind my donors that my job as a 3-Day walker, first and foremost, is to raise as much money as I can for Susan G. Komen®. I make this request knowing full well that many of my donors will not donate that much. But what I’m really doing is setting an expectation. Asking for a large amount says to my donors, “This is important, and your part in it is important.” Sometimes it works and I see those hundred dollar donations hit my account, but even if the donor is not willing or able to give that much, they will still end up giving as much as they can. On the other hand, back when I used to say, “Any amount is okay,” I found that donors would often give far less.susan g. komen 3-Day breast cancer walk blog fundraising donations

Attention-Grabbing Gimmicks Work – Last year, I sent out a fundraising email two weeks before my 37th birthday, challenging my supporters to help me raise 37 donations of $37 each before my big day. The amount I asked for was very specific, very manageable, and since the birthday angle tied to it was personal to me, it was highly appealing to my friends and family members. The response I got from donors was immediate and generous; I raised over $1300 in less than 2 weeks, based on this tactic alone. If I had thrown out a request that said, “Please make a donation in any amount in honor of my birthday” I can’t imagine the ploy would have been as successful. Click here to find some other fundraising strategies that incorporate specific donation amounts.

susan g. komen 3-Day breast cancer walk blog fundraising donations

 

Foolproof Tips for Fundraising Follow-ups

susan g. komen 3-Day breast cancer walk blog fundraising follow-up fridaySending out a fundraising email is one of the most commonly utilized fundraising tactics by Susan G. Komen 3-Day® participants, and for good reason: fundraising emails allow you to reach a potentially large audience quickly and easily, let you tell your potential donors about the Komen 3-Day and why you are taking part in it, and make it simple for donors to click through directly to your personal donation page. That’s why one of the first things the 3-Day® coaches will ask when a walker contacts them to lament the trouble they’re having with fundraising is, “Have you sent out a fundraising email yet?”

Well, have you? You have! Great job!

So now what?

The “now what” tends to be the same for most 3-Day participants: after sending out the first fundraising email, a flurry of donations will come in right away. You’ll feel great, inspired. For a lucky few of you, you’ll end up reaching your fundraising goal just from donations generated from that first email. But for most of you, you’ll notice that after a week or two, the rush of donations slows to a trickle, and you start wondering, “Is that it?”

I promise you, that’s not it. And that’s where the follow-up emails come in.

Here are my time-tested top nuggets of wisdom about working the follow-ups.

Always BCC – Just a quick word about sending out mass emails: always use the BCC (Blind Carbon Copy) function in your email program (or better yet, send your messages through the email function in your 3-Day Participant Center; you can BCC from there, too). This allows you to send a message to a large group of recipients without openly listing everyone’s email addresses in the To field. It’s important to be respectful of your potential donors’ privacy. That said, some email programs won’t let you see who was included in the BCC field once a message has been sent, so we recommend that you keep a separate list somewhere of everyone you sent your messages to.

A Gentle Nudge – When I was a coach for the 3-Day, I told people all the time that their initial fundraising email gets the word out about their 3-Day journey, but the real fundraising impact comes from the follow-ups. Yes, some people will be inspired to donate right away, but most of your donors probably file your message away under “I’ll get to this later” (especially if you’re sending your letters out months before your event). Sending a follow-up message to your original send list is a way to gently remind those folks who didn’t respond yet that, “Hey, I’m still here, and I’m still counting on your help.”

Time It Right – I think that, in general, 2-3 weeks is a good amount of time to let pass after sending your first fundraising email before you send out a follow-up. After that amount of time, it’s likely that your original message has been inadvertently forgotten or lost in someone’s inbox. So you give folks that gentle nudge, then subsequent follow-ups can be spaced out with the same amount of time, or up to a month apart.

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