Double Duty: Raise Funds WHILE Training for the 3-Day

Summer is a busy time of year for Susan G. Komen 3-Day® walkers, most of whom are right in the thick of their training schedules, while also continuing to raise money toward their fundraising goals. But with only so many hours in the day, wouldn’t it be grand if there was some way to knock out your Komen 3-Day fundraising and training all at once?

Look no further! We’ve got a few fantastic fundraising ideas that incorporate training right into them. Talk about efficiency!susan g. komen 3-Day breast cancer walk blog fundraising

Get Down to Business – When you’re heading out for a training walk, put on a 3-Day shirt, hat or wrap and tuck a few of your personalized 3-Day business cards (The3Day.org/cards) into your pack. When folks on the street take notice or ask about the 3-Day, hand them your business card and tell them why you’re walking. Whether it’s a neighbor you know or a complete stranger, remember that most potential donors simply need to be asked, and they’ll be happy to support you.

Smile and Say “Pleeeeease!” – You know all those selfies you take on your training walks then post to Facebook or Instagram? Include your personal fundraising URL on every single one. Need help setting up your personal web address? The coaches can help with that! Call them at 800-996-3DAY.

Work is Exercise – Seek out donations in exchange for services such as dog walking, babysitting, house cleaning, yard work or washing cars. These tasks will require some physical exertion on your part, so guess what: you just did some cross-training. Donations for services is an especially good strategy for young walkers who may not have as big a network of potential donors. (Think about it: if a teenager showed up at your house with a bucket, sponge and soap, wouldn’t you let them wash the car in your driveway for a $10 donation?)

You Train, Donors Gain – Set a date for a training walk where you’ll be covering an impressive number of miles (10 – 15). Advertise the training walk date on your Facebook page and/or by email. Ask people to pledge $1 – $5 per mile you will walk, and to make their donation to you online before your training walk day. Everyone who donates will be entered in an hourly drawing with a chance to win some prize of your choosing (a donated gift card, home baked cookies, etc.). Write the names of all entries on your training shirt (or on something else you are wearing) and post a Facebook or Instagram photo of yourself at the beginning of your walk. Also write their names on individual pieces of paper that you will carry with you. At every hour mark (when you’re stopping to stretch anyway…you are stopping to stretch every hour, right?), draw a winner and post updates on Facebook. Your donors will be excited about following your progress throughout the day.

“No, no, don’t get up. I’ll come to you!” – Reach out to friends and family members who live reasonably close to you, and tell them you’ll walk X miles to their homes to pick up donations from them. That way, you get a few minutes of face time with a friend or neighbor, you log some training miles and you collect money toward your fundraising goal.

Get Moving in One Place – If you have access to a treadmill, ask a local business if you can set it up outside by the front door, hang a donation bucket on the front and walk on the treadmill for a few hours. This will be a training walk and a fundraising event all in one. Of course people will want to know what you’re doing (or just gawk), and that’s your cue to tell them about the 3-Day. Share how much money you’re raising to fund a cure for breast cancer, and show them where the bucket is. If they don’t drop any money into the bucket (even if they do), hand them your 3-Day business card and ask them to read your story online (where you have personalized your fundraising page) and make a donation from their computer or smart phone.

 

What other ways can you think of to combine training and fundraising?

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